Who Controls What in Politics in the USA?

American politics are controlled by a number of institutions and groups. Here’s a look at who controls what in politics in the USA.

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The President

The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. In contemporary times, the president is looked upon as one of the world’s most powerful political figures and as the leader of one of the great powers of the world.

The President is the head of state, the head of the federal government, and the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States of America. The president directs the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. In contemporary times, the president is looked upon as one of the world’s most powerful political figures and as the leader of one of the great powers. The role includes responsibility for the world’s most expensive military, which has more than 2.8 million active troops as of 2017[update] and 732,000 Reserve personnel. The president also leads a organized machine that recommends Supreme Court nominees when vacancies occur and has many executive powers under both Title 10 Section 2 Clause 1 and Title 28 Section 2 Clause 1 of the United States Constitution.

The President has the power to veto legislation, make executive orders, and appoint Supreme Court justices.

The President of the United States is the head of state and head of government of the United States, as well as the commander-in-chief of the armed forces. The president is indirectly elected by the people through the Electoral College to a four-year term, and is one of only two American officials (the other being the vice president) who, by law, may serve for two terms. The president leads the executive branch of the federal government and is the commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces.

The president has numerous powers, including:
-The power to veto legislation
-The power to make executive orders
-The power to appoint Supreme Court justices
-The power to grant pardons

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The Vice President

The election of the Vice President of the United States is an indirect election in which citizens who are registered to vote in one of the fifty U.S. states or in Washington, D.C., cast ballots not directly for the Vice President, but instead for members of the Electoral College. These electors then cast direct votes, known as electoral votes, for President and Vice President. The Vice President is the second-highest executive official in the United States government, after the President, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession.

The Vice President is the head of the Senate and presides over the Senate.

The Vice President is the head of the Senate and presides over the Senate. In this capacity, the Vice President is responsible for maintaining order and decorum, recognizing Senators to speak, and ruling on procedural questions. The Vice President also serves as a member of the Cabinet and as the President of the Senate’s executive branch.

The Vice President has the power to break tie votes in the Senate.

The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest officer in the executive branch of the U.S. federal government, after the President of the United States, and ranks first in the presidential line of succession. The Vice President is also an officer in the legislative branch, as President of the Senate. In this capacity, the Vice President presides over Senate deliberations, but may not vote except to cast a tie-breaking vote. The Vice President also presides over joint sessions of Congress.

The Speaker of the House

The Speaker of the House is the leader of the House of Representatives, and as such, controls what bills are brought to the floor for a vote. The Speaker is also second in the line of succession for the presidency, after the Vice President.

The Speaker of the House is the leader of the House of Representatives.

The Speaker of the House is the leader of the House of Representatives, and is elected by the members of that body. The current speaker is Nancy Pelosi, who has been in office since January 2019.

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The Speaker is responsible for a number of important duties, including:

– Presiding over debates in the House chamber
– Deciding which members may speak during debates
– Voting in the House (in the event of a tie)
– Appointing members to committees
– Serving as a liaison between the House and the president

The Speaker is second in line for succession to the presidency, after the vice president.

The Speaker of the House has the power to bring legislation to the floor for a vote and decides which committees bills will go to.

The Speaker of the House is the leader of the United States House of Representatives. The Speaker is elected by the representatives for a two-year term. He or she presides over the House and is responsible for maintaining order during debate. The Speaker is also responsible for bringing legislation to the floor for a vote and deciding which committees bills will go to.

The current Speaker of the House is Nancy Pelosi, who was elected on January 3, 2019. She is the first woman to ever hold this position.

The Senate

The Senate is the upper chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the House of Representatives—the lower chamber—comprises the legislature of the United States. The Senate Chamber is located in the north wing of the Capitol, in Washington, D.C. The Senate has two senators for each state, chosen by the people of that state for six-year terms.

The Senate has the power to confirm presidential appointments and ratify treaties.

The Senate is one of the two houses of the United States Congress, the other being the House of Representatives. The Senate is considered to be the more prestigious and influential of the two houses, as it has certain powers and responsibilities not granted to the House, such as confirming presidential appointments and ratifying treaties. The Senate also has the power to try impeachment cases against federal officials, although this power is rarely exercised.

The Senate can also impeach a president.

The Senate has the power to impeach a president, which is like charging someone with a crime. In order to impeach the president, the Senate must have a two-thirds majority vote. The House of Representatives also has to vote on whether or not to impeach the president. If both the Senate and the House vote to impeach the president, then the president is removed from office.

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The House of Representatives

The House of Representatives is the lower chamber of the United States Congress, which along with the Senate- makes up the legislature of the United States. The House of Representatives is comprised of 435 voting members, each of whom represents a congressional district. The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435.

The House of Representatives has the power to pass legislation.

The primary power of the House of Representatives is to pass federal legislation that affects the entire nation, although its bills must also be approved by the Senate and signed by the president before they become law. The House has several other important powers: it approves all spending bills, it elects the president in the event that no candidate wins a majority of electoral votes, and it may impeach (accuse of wrongdoing) high-ranking government officials, including the president.

The House of Representatives can also impeach a president.

The House of Representatives is the lower house of the bicameral United States Congress, the Senate being the upper house. Together they compose the national legislature of the United States.

The composition and powers of the House are established by Article One of the United States Constitution. The House is composed of representatives who sit in congressional districts that are allocated to each state on a basis of population as measured by the U.S. Census, with each district entitled to one representative. Since its inception in 1789, all representatives have been directly elected; there have never been any appointed representatives. The total number of voting representatives is fixed by law at 435, as established by the Apportionment Act of 1911.Each representative serves a two-year term and may be elected to multiple terms. They are usually subordinated to state and local governments and lobbyists; however, they occasionally act independently of these entities.

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