How to Cite M.J.C. Vile. (2007).

How to Cite M.J.C. Vile. (2007).

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What is an MLA in-text citation?

An MLA in-text citation is a reference to a source that you have used in your text. It includes the author’s last name and the page number where the source can be found. For example, (Vile, 2007, p. 23).

An MLA in-text citation is a brief reference to a source of information used in the body of an essay or paper.

An MLA in-text citation is a brief reference to a source of information used in the body of an essay or paper. The citation includes the author’s name, the title of the work, and the page number on which the information was found. The citation is placed within parentheses after the quotation or paraphrase.

For example:

According to M.J.C. Vile, “The proper place for punishment is not in society at large but in the offender’s home” (Vile 2007, 73).

The in-text citation must correspond to an entry in a Works Cited page at the end of the paper.

The in-text citation must correspond to an entry in a Works Cited page at the end of the paper. In MLA style, referring to the works of others in your text is done by using what is known as parenthetical citation. This method involves placing relevant source information in parentheses after a quote or a paraphrase.

General guidelines:
-The in-text citation must correspond to an entry in a Works Cited page at the end of the paper.
-The Works Cited entry should contain all information necessary to guide your reader to the full citation in your bibliography.
-The parenthetical citations should be as brief and as close to your text as possible. If you are quoting directly from a work, include the author’s last name, the year of publication, and the page number where the quote can be found (preceded by “p.”). For example: (Smith 16).

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How to format an MLA in-text citation

Here is an example of how to format an MLA in-text citation for a book: (Vile, 2007). If you are citing a website, the format would be (Vile).

The in-text citation must be enclosed in parentheses.

In MLA style, in-text citations, called parenthetical citations, are used to document any external sources used within a document (unless the material cited is considered general knowledge). The parenthetical citation immediately follows the quoted or paraphrased material. The in-text citation must be enclosed in parentheses and should include the author’s last name and the specific page number or numbers referenced, with no intervening punctuation. If you’re quoting from a source, you’ll need to include the page number on which the quote appears.

The in-text citation must include the author’s last name and the page number(s) of the information used.

When citing sources in the body of your paper, you must include an in-text citation for every reference made. An in-text citation is a brief reference included in your writing that indicates the source you consulted. It should include the author’s last name and the page number(s) of the information used.

For example, if you were citing information from page 23 of M.J.C. Vile’s book The Philosophy of Environmentalism, your in-text citation would look like this: (Vile 23).

How to use an MLA in-text citation

When you are using a direct quote, paraphrase, or summarizing from a source, you must include an in-text citation. The in-text citation will give the reader information about the source, such as the author’s name, the date, and the page number (if available).

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In-text citations are used when the author’s last name is known.

If you are quoting directly, or if you are paraphrasing, you will need to include an in-text citation. An in-text citation is a brief reference included in your writing to support your claim or interpretation of a piece of evidence from another work. The in-text citation appears within your sentence, directly after the evidence you have used.

In MLA style, an in-text citation must include the author’s last name and the page number where you found the evidence. If you are quoting directly, you will also need to include quotation marks around the evidence.

Here is an example of an in-text citation for a direct quote:

According to M.J.C. Vile, “The French quite rightly consider Rousseau their greatest political thinker” (207).

Notice that:
The author’s last name (Vile) appears before the quote.
The page number (207) appears after the quote.

If the author’s last name is not known, use the title of the work instead.

If the author of a work is not known, use the title of the work instead. The title should be in quotation marks. If you are citing a entire work, use the title in italics.

Examples of MLA in-text citations

MLA (Modern Language Association) style is most commonly used to write papers and cite sources within the liberal arts and humanities. This resource, updated to reflect the MLA Handbook (8th ed.), offers examples for the general format of MLA research papers, in-text citations, endnotes/footnotes, and the Works Cited page.

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(Vile, 2007, p. 17)

MLA in-text citations provide brief information about a source within the text of a paper. These citations usually correspond to entries in a bibliography or reference list at the end of your paper. In MLA style, in-text citations are placed in parentheses after the quoted, paraphrased, or summarized material.

Here are some examples of MLA in-text citations:

“In his essay ‘The American Scholar,’ Emerson writes . . .” (Vile, 2007, p. 17)

Vile suggests that “quotation marks should be used sparingly” (2007, p. 17).

(Citing Sources, 2017)

There are various ways to format in-text citations in MLA style, depending on the type of source you are referencing.

For instance, if you are referencing a book, you would write:

(Vile, 2007)

If you are referencing a journal article, you would write:

(Smith, 2016)

And if you are referencing a website, you would write:

(“MLA Formatting and Style Guide”, 2017)

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